SOLEMNITY OF MARY, MOTHER OF GOD

honoring Mary

Her children rise up and call her blessed; (Proverbs 31:28)

and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior! For He has looked with favor on the humble state of His servant. From now on all generations will call me blessed. 49For the Mighty One has done great things for me. Holy is His name. ( Luke 1:48)

Are you and I running like young children to tell others of this Good News: A savior was promised to come…and He did! Why? Because Mary said ‘yes’. Eve said ‘no’ but Mary said ‘yes’. It is what they call ‘Mary’s fiat’. And her children rise up in every generation, just as she foretold, and call her blessed!

Do you want to feel the same heart-pounding excitement? Do you want to feel new in this new year? Then you and I must allow God to help us recapture what it is like to be a child who retains wonder at the astounding Good News He has given to us!

“Jesus invited a little child to stand among them. “Truly I tell you, He said, “unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Therefore, whoever humbles himself like this little child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.… (Matthew 18:3)

When a little child is excited, he is also humble. His eyes are wide with wonder at the same things that were wonderful the day before, now and will be tomorrow. He is not embarrassed in the slightest. Chesterton observed that the key to retaining wonder was gratitude and humility. And that is what we must do if we are to be as those who enter the Kingdom, if we are to become new again, if we are to become young again with eyes full of wonder and gratitude. Such eyes and hearts are those who easily want to run to their mother and call her blessed.

Chesterton also has a wonderful passage in Orthodoxy that explains this:

“Because children have abounding vitality, because they are in spirit fierce and free, therefore they want things repeated and unchanged. They always say, “Do it again”; and the grown-up person does it again until he is nearly dead. For grown-up people are not strong enough to exult in monotony. But perhaps God is strong enough to exult in monotony. It is possible that God says every morning, “Do it again” to the sun; and every evening, “Do it again” to the moon. It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike; it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never got tired of making them. It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy; for we have sinned and grown old, and our Father is younger than we.”
― G. K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

So with new vigor, new childlike energy, are we ready to run like those men before us, to tell others of the Good News of our Lord and Savior and His Kingdom and of the woman who through a simple act of obedience became the most blessed woman of all time? It’s a New Year and God has promised that He is making all things new. Even you. Even me.

“What the gods are supposed to be, what the priests are commissioned to say, is not a sensational secret like what those running messengers of the Gospel had to say. Nobody else except those messengers has any Gospel; nobody else has any good news; for the simple reason that nobody else has any news.

Those runners gather impetus as they run. Ages afterwards they still speak as if something had just happened. They have not lost the speed and momentum of messengers; they have hardly lost, as it were, the wild eyes of witnesses. In the Catholic Church, which is the cohort of the message, there are still those headlong acts of holiness that speak of something rapid and recent; a self-sacrifice that startles the world like a suicide. But it is not a suicide; it is not pessimistic; it is still as optimistic as St. Francis of the flowers and birds. It is newer in spirit than the newest schools of thought; and it is almost certainly on the eve of new triumphs. For these men serve a mother who seems to grow more beautiful as new generations rise up and call her blessed. We might sometimes fancy that the Church grows younger as the world grows old.”
― G.K. Chesterton, Conclusion, The Everlasting Man

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